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When a Permit is Needed - Frequently Asked Questions

I’m building a dock from my property. Do I need a permit?

Yes. If you’re building a dock that originates from a parcel that you own, you must obtain a Programmatic General Permit 0083 permit (PGP) from our office.  Please contact our office to arrange a site visit so your local Permit Coordinator can guide you through the process and ensure compliance of your project.

I want to modify my existing dock. Do I need a permit?

Yes. If you have an existing dock on a parcel that you own, you must obtain a modification to your permit. If the dock structure was built prior to CRD issuing permits, you must obtain a new permit from our office to ensure you are compliant.  Please contact our office to arrange a site visit so your local Permit Coordinator can guide you through the process and ensure compliance of your project.

I want to build a community dock or marina from my property to serve multiple people. Do I need a permit?

Yes. If you’re building a community dock or marina that is not intended for single-family private use from a residential lot, you will need to apply for a Coastal Marshlands Protection Act Permit (CMPA).

Please contact our office to arrange a site visit so your local Permit Coordinator can guide you through the process and ensure compliance of your project.

I want to maintain my dock/bulkhead/marina/bank stabilization. Do I need a permit?

No. A permit is not required for maintenance is as long as

  • The structure is serviceable, meaning it can be safely used for its intended purpose.
  • The maintenance activity does not increase the footprint of the structure.
  • The maintenance activity does not change the configuration of the dock.

Before you begin any maintenance activity please contact our office to arrange a site visit so your local Permit Coordinator can ensure compliance of your project.

I have an eroding bank on my property that I want to stabilize. Do I need a permit?

Yes. You need a permit to put a bulkhead or riprap on any tidally influenced creek/river bank. Please contact our office to arrange a site visit so your local Permit Coordinator can guide you through the process and ensure compliance of your project.  You will also need to contact your county entity and/or the Environmental Protection Division to ensure compliance within the 25' erosion and sediment buffer.  You will also need to contact the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for proper authorization.

I want to clear my marsh front land. Do I need a permit?

No. You don’t need a permit from our office to clear land. However, you do need to have your marsh line marked.  Please contact our office to arrange a site visit so your local Permit Coordinator can ensure compliance of your project. You will also need to call your county entity and/or the Environmental Protection Division to ensure compliance within the 25' erosion and sediment buffer.

I live on the beach and I want to do some work on my property.  Do I need a permit?

Maybe. State jurisdiction along the shore is determined by the Shore Protection Act (SPA).  Activities such as construction or landscaping may require a permit under the SPA. Please contact our office to arrange a site visit so your local Permit Coordinator can guide you through the process and ensure compliance of your project.

My project does not seem to fit under any of the listed required permits, but activity for the project will occur in a tidally influenced area. Do I need a permit?

Maybe. Some projects, like culverts for drainage, or monitoring stations for scientific studies don’t fit under the restrictions of typical permits, but do require regulatory approval, such as a Revocable License. Any activity within proximity of the marsh and shore areas requires review by our office to determine jurisdiction and potential regulatory approval. Please contact our office to arrange a site visit so your local Permit Coordinator can guide you through the process and ensure compliance of your project.

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